Gear review: Keeping cool with the Hydro Flask

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In the summer months, one of the big needs for people who are active in the outdoors is water. But a major problem is keeping that water cold.

Conversely, the icy blow of winter conditions can be softened by a hot drink.

But as we’ve all experienced, the conditions often make those cool/hot drinks rather tepid.

Enter Hydro Flask. The maker of insulated metallic water bottles promises to keep the cold nice and icy and keep the hot stuff steaming.

We’re in prime hot weather conditions right now, so this is a great time of year to put the Hydro Flask to the test.

The testing conditions: Bright, hot and humid weather on a 90-minute trail run. Starting temps were 93 degrees, and by the time I got done, they’d risen to 95.

The goal: To see how well as 12-ounce Hydro Flask would keep my ice water cold.

Observations: A metal flask is going to be heavier than plastic, but not so much as to be cumbersome. It fit perfectly in my Nathan Triangle hydration pack. Being a 12-ouncer, it was a bit small for a 90-minute workout, but no worries — they make many, many sizes to suit a lot of different needs.

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How it performed: In a word, flawlessly. I sipped on my water throughout the run, trying to conserve what I had. By the time I finished, there was nothing left but ice cubes. Yes, after 90 minutes in mid-90s temperatures, the Hydro Flask kept itself cold enough inside to keep the ice cubes intact. Hydro Flask advertises that its double-wall insulated stainless steel construction can keep drinks cold for 24 hours. What I can tell you is that it was more than up to the task for my run.

The price is decent: about $20 for the 12-ounce bottle.

Some other features: It’s BPA-free and has a lifetime warranty.

In the future, I’ll test its abilities to keep hot drinks hot. But round one is a success. You can look at Hydro Flask products at hydroflask.com.

Note: The Hydro Flask was part of a box of complimentary products furnished to me by Cairn, a monthly subscription company that sends subscribers boxes of gear to try out for themselves. For more information about Cairn, go to getcairn.com or follow Cairn on Twitter @getCairn.

Bob Doucette

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