Ueli Steck dies in a fall in the Himalayas

The mountaineering community suffered a huge loss on Sunday following a fall in the Himalayas that claimed the life of Ueli Steck. He was 40 years old.

Known as the Swiss Machine, Steck was well known for a high number of speed ascent records all over the world. He’s spent the last few years going to the Himalyas trying harder routes, and is credited with being the first to ascend  Annapurna’s south face solo. In 2015, he climbed 82 4,000-meter peaks in 80 days. He’s a two-time winner of the Piolet d’Or, mountaineering’s highest honor.

This spring, Steck was attempting to climb the Lohtse-Everest traverse, gaining Everest’s summit by its notoriously difficult west ridge. He was acclimatizing near a neighboring peak, Nuptse, when he fell 1,000 meters to his death on Sunday, according to Reuters.

For more on Steck and Sunday’s accident, read this report from Outside Online.

To see more on his planned project this spring, watch this video.

The Weekly Stoke: Sherpas killed on Everest, Ueli Steck’s ascent questioned, marathon tips and the country’s least outdoorsy cities

Mount Everest. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Mount Everest. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

So sorry for missing last week, but sometimes life happens and you have to step away. But we’re back with the Weekly Stoke, and trust me, there’s plenty to talk about! So let’s get to it.

First off, the biggest news in the outdoors world, and it’s not good. An avalanche killed at least 12 Sherpas near Camp 1 on Mount Everest, and the search is on for more guides who are still missing. The tragedy makes it the deadliest single day in the history of climbing that mountain.

Staying in the Himalayas, there is some controversy concerning Ueli Steck’s solo ascent of Annapurna.

Thinking about relocating to a new city? If you are into outdoorsy activities in your city, there are some places that don’t cut it, according to this list.

Here is a list of tips for people running their first marathon.

And speaking of that, this blogger has some tips on how to properly carb load pre-race.

Do you have a list of excuses keeping you from getting out there, or how well you “perform?” This writer wants to have a word with you.

And finally, here’s a Q&A from a guy who is walking across the country.

The Weekly Stoke: Ueli Steck on Annapurna, Les Stroud, survival stories, NYC and Marine Corps Marathon news, and caves under Mount Hood

Annapurna. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Annapurna. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Took the week off last week, but we’re right back to it with some good links on this edition of the Weekly Stoke! Check these out:

Congratulations to Ueli Steck for his successful ascent of Annapurna. Steck had twice been denied this mountain’s summit, but this time did it in style, climbing its south face solo. That’s a feat that has never been done before, and just months after his harrowing brawl incident on Everest.

Les Stroud talks about what survivalism is really all about, and has some critiques for others who take their chances just for the TV cameras.

Here are some tips for summiting Pikes Peak.

From The Adventure Journal, a list of the 9 most intense bivvies.

Here’s a first-hand account of what it’s like dealing with a rescue situation in the backcountry, also from The Adventure Journal.

Some victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are learning to run again.

Organizers of the Marine Corps Marathon and the New York City Marathon are banning hydration packs from being used during those races.

Finally, check out this cool video of exploring caves under Oregon’s Mount Hood.

The Weekly Stoke: Ueli Steck to tackle Annapurna, non-competitive racing, extreme selfies and kayaking flooded Boulder Creek

Annapurna. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Annapurna. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Ah, home sweet home after a week in Colorado. Plenty to talk about, but before going any further on that, let’s get into the news of the day. Time for the Weekly Stoke!

Ueli Steck’s last trip to the Himalaya didn’t go so well, with a near brawl on Everest. But he’s back, and this time planning to tackle the range’s deadliest peak: Annapurna.

Car camping is one thing. Living out of your car is another. But how about rehabbing an entire bus? This guy is road living in style and spent maybe 5 percent of what it costs to buy a new RV.

Are running road races becoming less competitive? This writer says races are becoming less “race” and more “parade.”

Social media is filled with annoying, duck-lipped selfies, but this link has some extreme versions that are kind of cool.

Finally, this group of kayakers decided to make the best of a bad situation, riding the currents of a flooded Boulder Creek last week.

The Weekly Stoke: The mess on Everest, man fights off a bear and one runner’s journey from Boston to Oklahoma City

Mount Everest. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

Mount Everest. (Wikipedia Commons photo)

This edition of the Weekly Stoke is going to have a pretty heavy emphasis on Mount Everest, but plenty of other goodies await. It’s been an interesting week in the outdoors.

First, I’m sure that most people have heard about the fight that happened at Camp 2 on Mount Everest. And there are many conflicting stories about how it went down. In short, three European climbers got in a conflict with Sherpas setting fixed lines on Everest, which led to a brawl in which the Europeans were assaulted by angry Sherpas. The Sherpas claimed the Europeans had ice kicked down on them while rope-setting work was being done.

One of the climbers, Simone Moro, tells the tale in this post.

And here, a second member of the European team, Ueli Steck, describes his version of the events. And it seems as if it was pretty scary. The parties did get together to forge a sort of truce, but many are saying that future incidents like this are not only possible, but likely. It seems the circus that is Everest just took a very dark turn.

A couple weeks after the Boston Marathon bombings, some of the runners who were prevented from finishing that race ran in the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon. CNN’s John Sutter tells the story of one of those runners, and weaves in some other storylines we well.

Here’s a list of the kinds of dudes you don’t want to be.

And then there’s this list — the six most dangerous hiking trails in the U.S.

And finally, the story to end all stories: A man fights off an Alaskan brown bear with nothing more than a tripod and his bare hands. Try topping  that one at the office watercooler!