Pandemic pounds, body image, and why people are asking the wrong questions

I’m just saying, maybe we should ask different questions about our fitness during the pandemic.

There are two competing messages in regards to what has happened to people’s fitness during the pandemic.

The first goes something like, “Here’s how to lose all those pandemic pounds!” Or something like that.

The second is a stiff counter narrative, admonishing people to give themselves grace if they’ve added a few, and scolding those who, in their minds, are guilt-tripping people over their inability to uphold a body image ideal during a stressful time.

In both cases, the focus is more or less on appearance. What I’m going to suggest is scrapping both narratives for something more useful.

But first, let me tell you a personal story. It goes like this:

When the pandemic hit the U.S. in earnest about a year ago, my gym shut down. I did workouts from home for a couple of months until it reopened. I waited to see how serious the gym’s management would take COVID-19 safety protocols, was satisfied with their work and started up again. So I began lifting hard, eating to gain some muscle, and running less. Seeing that in-person races weren’t on the horizon, I figured I’d go all-in on the lifting and run just enough to keep up a measure of cardiovascular fitness.

The good news is that I got a lot stronger. I gained some muscle mass. And I was “fit” enough to do some of the more taxing things I love.

The bad news is that without the normal fall race season, I didn’t have that one piece of my training that kept my weight in check: long runs, speed work, and plenty of mileage. Once summer ended, I didn’t switch to race training. I just kept doing the same thing I’d been doing since May.

As my strength gains peaked in February, my body did what everyone’s will do: Plateau. It’s inevitable that any strength program has a shelf life, and the fact that I was able to use mine for nine months and see gains throughout that time is astonishing. But even then, a ceiling was reached.

I got stronger during the pandemic. But I let some things slide that are biting me in the butt right now.

And by consistently eating more than normal (sometimes by design, and sometimes because work-from-home = easy access to the fridge), my body did what a lot of people’s bodies will do: It stopped using those extra calories for muscle-building and started storing them as body fat. There’s a term for it: insulin resistance. And it’s a bad thing. So while I picked up a good amount of strength, I also gained a bunch of extra weight in all the wrong places: in my belly, around my waist, and very likely around my vital organs. Needless to say, that’s not healthy.

I found that as I got heavier, all the other things I liked doing – running, biking and hiking – all got harder, and not just in terms of being winded. My back, hips, knees, ankles and feet all let me know that carrying around a lot of extra weight was doing harm.

So I have a choice: live with my new pandemic pounds or get rid of them.

Going back to my original point about the two competing narratives: In both cases, the focus is on the wrong thing. On one side, you’ve got someone urging you to look your best, and on the other is one telling you to love your body as it is. On the surface, neither is necessarily wrong. But the question they pose is.

What should the focus be? Answer: How is my body performing?

How I see it, body “performance” is examined in two ways. I’m going to use really general terms to keep it easy. One way is “internal” and the other is “external.”

Internal includes things such as how well your cardiovascular system is oxygenating your body. Is your heart working harder than it should? How’s your blood pressure? Does your current physical condition compromise your immune system? Are the habits you picked up during the pandemic negatively affecting your metabolism? How well are you sleeping compared to pre-pandemic weight gain? Are your internal organs functioning properly? How does your blood work look? If the answers to these questions fall to the negative side, this isn’t a question of “body love.” This is a question of your short- and long-term health prospects.

External has to do with how your body moves. Are you more gassed from walking a flight of stairs? Are you finding that your back hurts more? How are your hips, knees and ankles feeling when you’re out for a longer walk? Or when you run? Or after a tennis match?

If you’re more athletically inclined, how are your times looking on your training runs? Or when you’re on the bike? Are you falling further behind your pre-pandemic athletic performance? If the answer is yes, then you’ve got work to do if you want to regain those abilities.

The fact is this: We beat ourselves up with false narratives on body image. BMI is a joke, but it’s still used. We look at “the ideal” and conclude we’re slacking if we don’t resemble fitness models or Instagram stars. All of that needs to go away if it’s undermining your mindset. I’ve seen plenty of people who don’t have the right “numbers,” whether it’s body composition, BMI, weight on the scale, and so on, but their bodies look just fine and they are physically capable of doing all the things they love (my fastest 5K time happened at a weight that was 15 pounds more than when I ran my second-fastest time). And often, they are internally very healthy people.

But if your body is not performing well – internally and externally – then now is not the time to hold back. If you can’t run or play a sport like you want to, or hike as far or as much as you used to, then the joy of those pursuits is stolen.

If I’m going to get back to this form, I’ve got some work to do. And body image has nothing to do with it.

More critically, if your body is not performing well internally, then you’re staring down a future filled with potentially expensive, painful and possibly debilitating health problems. Let that go on too long, and they can cascade. If your pandemic pounds aren’t hurting you and you’re fine with how you look, don’t let anyone guilt you into doing/feeling anything. But if those pandemic pounds are robbing you of your health, it’s time to act.

Bob Doucette

Trail work, conservation taking the next step at Turkey Mountain

Seen on a recent trail cleanup day. Volunteers hauled out trash and did some pruning and basic trail maintenance at Turkey Mountain in Tulsa.

Interesting things are underway on my local trails. Turkey Mountain used to be a place that was occasionally used but often neglected. As it became a more popular place for people to go, we saw more intensive efforts to clean up trash and repair badly damaged sections of trail.

But lately, stewardship of Turkey Mountain has matured. All of the other activities are still happening, but there is an increasing emphasis on making this patch of woods and its trail system more sustainable.

Earlier this winter, a work day included some routine trash pickup and pruning to keep the trails clear. But we also spent some time on habitat restoration.

Part of the recent work at Turkey Mountain: Closing off rogue trails and marking them as ecological restoration areas. Public lands entities have used this practice for years in an effort to repair areas damaged by misuse.

What this entailed was closing off rogue trails that had been marked earlier in the year and installing signage to tell people to let that area be for a while, and let nature take its course in getting it back to a more natural – and sustainable – state.

The National Parks System and the National Forest System has used similar practices to promote healing/repair to sections of trails that had become too worn or were chronic erosion problems. It’s become standard practice, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, like alpine tundra. Damage in those ecosystems can take several years to become whole again.

Habitat restoration work in progress at Turkey Mountain in Tulsa.

At Turkey Mountain, the scars will heal much faster. Temperate woodlands are remarkably resilient. But heavy usage – by hikers, runners, cyclists and others – means a lot more wear and tear. And to be frank, many of these trails were not made with much attention given to the effects of erosion. That’s made several trails turn into ugly, rutted washouts, brown gashes exposing rocks and tree roots that promise to get worse. So I imagine we’re going to be doing restoration work on several areas for many years to come.

More recently, a group went out to scout out more areas where trail work can be done. There are big plans for Turkey Mountain, ideas that focus on making trails more durable while keeping the park as wild as it can be. Some trouble spots were identified, and in looking at these places I walked some paths I hadn’t seen before. There are ponds all over Turkey Mountain, but I didn’t know that one of them (one I hadn’t seen before) was a substantial beaver pond, complete with a lodge. It’s a good reminder that while the park is in the middle of a city, it’s still home to numerous species of wildlife. We enjoy recreating there, but for these creatures, Turkey Mountain is home. Food for thought not only as we work there, but also in terms of how we play there.

The River Parks Authority in Tulsa is working with volunteers and experts to identify future areas of trail work that need to be done at Turkey Mountain. On a broader scale. RPA is working toward implementing a master plan for Turkey Mountain aimed at balancing outdoor recreation needs and conservation for long-term sustainability.

More big news from Turkey Mountain is coming. The pandemic delayed or canned some plans, but with COVID-19 finally starting to loosen its grip, there’s a chance that a lot of the education programming, athletic events and other activities that were put on hold can resume.

It’s not lost on me that just a few years ago, the future of Turkey Mountain was in doubt. Single-year leases, a hodge-podge of privately owned parcels and a proposal to turn a chunk of it into an outlet mall made the park’s outlook unclear. It doesn’t seem that way now.

Volunteers scope out places for future trail work projects.
  • Bob Doucette

Two basics to know before hiking and climbing the 14ers

Summit dreams are powerful, and there’s nothing quite like the views. But being physically ready — or practiced — is key to being successful.

I could probably make a checklist of more than a dozen things to know before you tackle climbing a 14,000-foot peak. I wrote a series about it starting with this post. But the other day, I was thinking about how to boil down the issue into a couple of simple ideas before you get going.

More specifically, what can you do to get ready for the physical tasks of gaining a 14er summit?

On any of the 58 in Colorado, or the numerous 14ers in California, there are two things you’ll likely confront: Steep uphill hiking and “scrambling,” which is a fancy term for basic climbing.

Obviously, operating at high altitude is going to require a high level of cardiovascular fitness and stamina. How you get there – running, cycling, or some other form of exercise – is up to you. But in the midst of all that, there’s this:

You’re going to spend hours hiking uphill, and it is it’s own type of fitness. Solution: Find steeper uphill terrain and hike it. A lot.

You need to spend a good amount of time walking steep uphill inclines. Walking uphill sounds basic enough, but it is different than other forms of exercise, especially if the trail you’re hiking is steep. I heard a presentation from some professional mountain guides, and when asked if running or cycling would be sufficient, they said “no.” Instead, they advised loading up a backpack, finding local mountains or hills, and spending time hiking up those slopes. Don’t have hills? Find some staircases. Many gyms have stairmills, which will do in a pinch. Even if you’re hiking a mild route, expect to spend hours walking uphill in thin air, and possibly up steep grades. Work your way up to multi-hour hikes with increasing miles and plenty of vert. May as well get used to it now rather than gas out a mile into your ascent.

Not every mountain is something of which you can walk to the top. Some involve scrambles and climbs, and that’s a whole other physical skill set. If you feel comfortable climbing, more challenging mountain routes won’t seem as daunting.

If you’re going to tackle peaks with Class 3 or 4 routes, take up rock climbing. Routes are ranked 1-5, with Classes 1 and 2 still firmly in the realm of hiking. Once you hit Class 3 and higher, you’ll need to use your hands to help you ascend. On Class 4, the climbing becomes more challenging, the routes steeper and the moves more committing. Class 5 involves roped climbing, and there aren’t any standard routes on the Colorado 14ers that are Class 5 (though many alternative routes with this classification exist). Rock climbing, whether it’s in a gym or outside on natural crags, will get your mind and body used to the movement required and will help you become accustomed to heights. Both are hugely helpful when you’re on a mountain with big air around. Climbing with friends will add input and encouragement. When you get to the point of regularly completing 5.7-5.9 climbing routes, you’ll be ready to roll on just about any Class 3 or 4 route on a mountain.

In both cases, practice makes perfect. There are a ton of other considerations when climbing mountains, but these two are the foundation. You need to have your body and mind ready for the task, and the best way to do that is spend time doing the things you’ll be doing when you’re on the mountain.

Bob Doucette

A winter transformation

I am a fan of winter.

I live at a latitude that is not conducive to much snow. It happens on occasion, rarely accumulates and sometimes doesn’t even stick. Winter in the Southern Plains is mostly a brown and grey affair.

Not that I mind these winter hues, but I grew up in snowier climates. So sometimes I miss the white stuff.

Last month, we got a solid dump. I’d hesitate to call it a blizzard, but a good, heavy dose of thick, wet snow dropped somewhere around 5-6 inches on my city. And as anyone will tell you, I like to hike on days like that.

Here are some pics that show one of my favorite hiking spots about a week before the storm…

Still some green in there.
Bare trees and a bunch of rocks.
Okie forest, stripped bare of their greenery.
Low winter sun, lichens, shadows and stone.

There’s beauty just about anywhere at any time in the forest. But cover it in a bunch of snow? It’s like you’re in a whole other world.

The weight of the snow made this cool looking arch.
Too bad I couldn’t claim first tracks. But I had it to myself for most of this hike.
Remember this pic at the start? With stone and lichens? Here we go again, but with a blanket of snow on top.

I don’t have anything profound to say about these two hikes, other than the fact that winter, while sometimes dreary and dark, can be gorgeous and inviting. It was well worth the chill to see what the woods looked like with this frozen bounty.

Bob Doucette

Let’s talk about ‘active recovery’

Some people have “active recovery” all wrong. A short walk, a leisurely hike, or something else that does not resemble a workout is what it should be.

Folks, we need to have a talk.

A bunch of you, pandemic or not, are still training hard. There are a few races out there (virtual and in-person events). Your home setup might be complete enough where you don’t miss the gym.

If you’ve found a way to keep a training schedule going, good on ya. You haven’t let the Rona keep you down. So you’re doing your workouts, staying active, and taking a rest day, right?

Right?

“Well, I do ‘active recovery’ on my rest days,” you say.

Fair enough.

But what do you consider “active recovery?”

If your active recovery consists of a lesser version of a workout, it’s not active recovery.

To be more specific: If you’re a runner and your active recovery on your rest day is a run, it’s not active recovery.

If you’re a lifter and your active recovery day is a mellow day with the weights, it’s not active recovery.

If you’re anyone on the planet and your active recovery is a pickup game of basketball, soccer, football or whatever, it’s not active recovery.

Seeing a trend?

People who take a strong interest in fitness, sports and competition are driven people. The daily grind is a matter of routine, filled with tough workouts that test your mettle. Race day, comp day and game day are your stage to make all that training mean something, so a day off seems like a wasted opportunity.

That’s the mentality that drives higher performance and better fitness. But it’s also the thing that prompts people to train through injury (not good), do run streaks (just don’t) and join 30-, 60-, 90- or whatever-day challenges (whyyyyyy). The more-is-better deal is what gives us the Marathon Maniacs and Half Fanatics, and the people who believe getting a visit from Mr. Rhabdo is a badge of honor.

And then the injuries pile up and you’re sidelined. By that time, you’re getting all the rest days you never wanted.

Mr. and Ms. More Is Better are also the types who mischaracterize active recovery.

So what is it?

The thinking behind active recovery is that a little movement is better than being totally idle. There is a lot of merit to that. I don’t fault people for going into couch potato mode on a rest day. You need it. But moving a little on your rest day is actually better.

So what do you do? Some ideas:

Take a walk. Yup, it’s that simple. Lace up your shoes, go outside, and take a 30-minute stroll in your neighborhood. That will work out some soreness and keep you from getting too stiff. Movement is good. Just don’t turn it into an epic power walk or allow it morph into a run. Just walk.

Enjoy a short bike ride. Some rides are easy and flat, some are hard-charging. Do the former. Thirty minutes on a mellow ride is a good way to work out the kinks.

Try some yoga. Some low-intensity yoga might be just the trick to get your blood moving and alleviate the tightness in your muscles and joints.

Whip out the foam roller. It might not be the most comfortable way to spend an afternoon, but 30 minutes or so with a foam roller can work a lot like a massage and aid in muscle recovery.

Take a hike. Find an easy trail and book time for a few miles. No big summit hikes, no hard-charging paces. Just a mellow walk in the woods. Breathe some fresh air.

Active recovery is helpful in a few ways. Movement gets your circulation going, which aids in recovery. Doing something, even if it’s totally mellow, keeps that false guilt of inactivity from invading your head.

Most of the time, I go for a short walk on my rest day. Recently, it was something different.

I had a great week of training. A tough week. I ran some and lifted hard. My last lift of the week was a monthly “challenge day,” where I performed heavy deadlifts. It was an intense day to cap off an intense week. My joints were slightly angry, muscles were sore and central nervous system taxed.

But I wanted to make sure the dents and dings of the week didn’t settle in to body and become a problem.

So I did a hike – 3 miles, not much vert, casual pace. I stopped to take pics or observe wildlife. When I got home, I felt good. Loosened up. And hungry for lunch!

The next day, I was good to go: Recovered and ready to tackle a tough leg day workout, and everything else the weekly training schedule could throw at me.

So how will you do your rest day active recovery?  That’s up to you. Just make sure it’s not a workout.

Bob Doucette

Winter summits and flatlanders: It’s a lot harder than you think

Winter summits and flatlanders: It’s a lot harder than you think

The allure of a winter summit adventure is strong, but getting it done is far more complicated than just dressing warmer.

A question popped up recently on an online hiking forum, submitted by a guy from Texas.

He asked what Rocky Mountain peaks he should consider climbing in late fall. He said he would be traveling alone, and was open about the types of summits he’d achieved to date.

In short, he’d hiked about a half-dozen “beginner” peaks that topped 14,000 feet, and had done so in summer conditions. He got a lot of advice, even more warnings, and a few admonitions to pass on the idea altogether.

I love a good adventure, and testing yourself in conditions that are new to you can be enjoyable, and a way to grow. I mean, I’m the guy who watched YouTube videos on how to self-arrest with an ice axe before buying said axe, a pair of crampons and heading out for my first snow climb as green as it gets. Me and a buddy got our summit, got back down and didn’t get hurt or killed, so there you go. Sometimes you can booger-head your way through things as a noob.

On the other hand, we did this snow climb in late spring conditions – the easiest weather conditions you can get on a snow climb – and on a beginner-friendly route. Believe me, that played a significant role in our success.

But there are things about being in the high country this time of year that go beyond a smattering of extra challenges. For the newbie, flatlander crowd, here are a few I can think of…

In the mountains, fall often means winter. Aside from some pleasant September or even October days, there are times when conditions above 10,000 feet are full-on winter, calendar be damned. Weather systems can move through fast and plunge temperatures well below zero. Add in high winds and you could be facing wind chills that go -40 degrees or worse. That kind of cold will cause frostbite quickly to any exposed skin. Whiteout conditions are possible. Get caught up high in a storm near a summit, it can be many hours before you get back to a trailhead, and if you’re forced to stop and take shelter, rescue could be a day or more away. Don’t let the calendar fool you. For that matter, don’t let a pleasant fall day down low fool you, either. Things change fast up there.

Don’t equate your skiing experience as adequate for winter mountaineering. Sure, you’ve trekked from the plains of north Texas plenty of times to get some turns at your favorite ski resort. You’ve enjoyed the sport during powder days, in the cold, and felt pretty good (if a little chilled) on the ski lift up and the run down the mountain. But your ski attire is designed to be comfortable while you’re skiing. When you’re climbing a mountain, there’s no lodge with hot food, a steamy drink and a warm fire minutes away. It’s different when you’re many hours away from warmth of any kind and, mostly likely, isolated from any form of safety or rescue. You may have skied in below-zero temps, but it’s not the same.

High country hiking can be hard. Winter travel is MUCH harder. When you’re coming from the oxygen-rich environs of low altitudes, the lack of O2 hits you like a ton of bricks when you get above 10,000 feet. Simple uphill hiking on moderate grades feels exhausting. Now try breaking trail in knee-deep snow, with a weighty pack and all that cold-weather gear. I’ve heard it said that in winter, one mile is actually two. Oh, and those summer trailheads (and the roads leading to them) are likely closed, so you’ll be adding more miles and vertical gain. Slower going, more taxing conditions, longer routes and a less daylight. Something to think about.

Your gear list will be different. The obvious things that come to mind: Snowshoes, ice axe, crampons/microspikes, gaiters. But also, the clothing layering system has to keep you warm, but wick away sweat. You need to have gear that minimizes exposed skin, and it has to be rated to handle extreme cold. And your pack needs to have the gear needed to survive overnight on the mountain. That means an emergency shelter and a winter-rated sleeping bag. That summertime fast-and-light thing won’t cut it this time of year.

The benign mountains of summer can be dangerous in winter. Aside from high winds and extreme cold, the buildup of snow can change the hazards of even the tamest of peaks. Wheeler Peak, N.M., is about as “safe” as they get in the summer – a Class 1 route all the way to the top. But in winter, many of its slopes are avalanche-prone, something that’s true for a lot of Class 1 and 2 peaks anywhere in the Rockies, Sierras or Cascades. Getting buried in an avalanche is not akin to being covered in powdery fluff. Avalanche snow thickens and hardens, and when it finally stops it’s like being trapped in concrete. It’s key to understanding avalanche risk, and if you don’t know what to look for, a winter ascent may not be for you.

There’s more that is not mentioned here. A lot more. I don’t want to sound like a killjoy, and I know people’s safety boils down to personal responsibility. We all have the right to make those choices. But it would be a mistake to think that a winter summit bid is roughly the same as it is in summer, just colder. In truth, it’s a whole other animal.

For a more detailed post on this subject, including gear recommendations, check out this post.

Bob Doucette

Hiking Colorado’s Humboldt Peak

Humboldt Peak, as seen from Broken Hand Pass. (Mike Zee photo)

Note: This is the next in a series of trip reports focusing on route descriptions rather than storytelling. Photos and beta only!

Colorado’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains offer some of the finest alpine adventures you can find in the southern Rockies, with anything from beefy hikes to serious climbs. The peaks are more remote, being that they’re not that close to any larger cities, and some of them require a sturdier vehicle to reach trailheads.

One thing about the Colorado Sangres 14ers: There are not a lot of easy entry point peaks. All but a couple are Class 3 and 4, and some of them are among the toughest of the state’s 14,000-foot peaks.

But if you’re looking for a mountain that will give you those spectacular Sangres views without the commitment of a Class 3 or 4 climb, then Humboldt Peak might be your ticket.

Humboldt is one of three 14ers surrounding South Colony Lakes and is accessible via the same road and trailhead. It’s technically a walk-up, though I found a couple of more difficult scrambly sections higher on the mountain. The big reward for reaching Humboldt’s summit is the incredible platform to see Crestone Needle and Crestone Peak, just west of South Colony Lakes. That alone makes Humboldt’s summit a worthy prize.

There are two ways to get to the top: One is via the very long east ridge, the other a shorter route with less vertical gain via its west ridge. This will be about the latter.

You can drive on 120 Road near Westcliffe for a short distance to a two-wheel-drive trailhead or, if your vehicle is four-wheel-drive and capable, continue 2.7 miles to a gate that marks the end of the drivable portion of the road.

Easy hiking past the road and into the woods near South Colony Lakes.

From the four-wheel-drive trailhead, hike up the road past the gate and over a foot bridge until you reach a trail junction turnoff to your right. Follow easy trail hiking through the woods and past some campsites. (Many people hiking Humboldt or climbing the Crestones choose to backpack and camp here, then begin their ascents the next day. It’s a beautiful place to camp.)

Humboldt Peak, as seen from the south. (Mike Zee photo)

Gaining altitude, and seeing Crestone Needle along the way.

You’ll be hiking the trail east of and above South Colony Lakes. From here, you’ll begin hiking up long switchbacks on a headwall leading to a saddle between Humboldt’s west ridge and an area nearby called Bear’s Playground. Turn right at the saddle to gain to Humboldt’s west ridge.

Hiking up to Humboldt’s saddle, you get this view of South Colony Lakes and Broken Hand Peak.

At Humboldt’s saddle. The peak pictured here is not your target, but rather a point of interest on your way to Bear’s Playground if you’re headed that way.

A view of Humboldt Peak as seen from Crestone Needle’s summit. At lower left, you can see the saddle, and trace your route to the top on the mountain’s west ridge. (Mike Zee photo)

The trail steepens as you gain the ridge, and as you ascend, you’ll end up doing some rock-hopping and light scrambling. The route is well-cairned, and the cairns are fairly accurate. At times, the trail will disappear into jumbled rocks, then reappear when the terrain eases.

Getting closer to the top.

Almost there. It’s hard not to look over your shoulder at that view.

Eventually, the ridge will take you up to Humboldt’s false summit – there is still some work to do. But once you reach this point, the ascent is almost done.

Past the false summit, with the real summit in view. Easy breezy from here.

Summit view.

Past the false summit, the steepness eases with only a few hundred yards of easy hiking left to the top.

Once there, you’ve earned one heck of a view. Two your west is one of the most spectacular mountain scenes in the Sangres, that of Crestone Peak, Crestone Needle, Broken Hand Peak and the South Colony Lakes. If you time your hike right, you’ll catch the sunrise alpenglow on Crestone Needle’s east face – an incredible and unforgettable sight.

Humboldt Peak’s real treasure is this view of the Crestones. Not easily forgotten.

The route is Class 2, 11 miles round trip with 4,200 feet of elevation gain and mild exposure.

NOTE: If your car/truck does not have four-wheel drive and good clearance, you’ll need to park at the two-wheel drive trailhead. This will add 5.4 miles and another 1,100 feet of elevation gain to your route.

Want to read the original trip report? Check it out here.

Bob Doucette

GPS is fine, but give me my paper maps

The wonders of GPS are thorough. Transformative, even. But there’s no pleasure in them for me.

I was reminded of that this summer when I was given a road atlas to take with me on a trip. I gratefully accepted it, knowing full well I didn’t need it. But I wanted it, and that’s a key distinction.

I’m old enough to remember when paper maps were a necessity. And that’s how I got around, learning what routes to take across multiple states and through numerous towns where I’d never been. Back then, there was no pleasant-sounding voice politely telling me to turn right in 300 feet, or to keep going straight for the next 10 miles. Getting from Point A to a far-away Point B took a little research.

I know this makes me sound like a Luddite, but that’s OK. For me, it was as simple as this: Instead of typing in a destination of choice, picking a route and punching “start” on my phone, I had the pleasure of opening that atlas, looking where I was, and running an index finger along squiggly lines until I was able to connect the dots between where I was and where I wanted to be. In doing so, I also saw what I might pass: towns of interest, wildlife refuges, mountain ranges and national parks. Tracing my route on paper gave me things to look forward to.

It was a little like watching “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” and watching the scenes where you could see on a map where Indiana Jones was flying to now, and where he ended up – always in some romantic, exotic, adventurous locale we could only dream of. Alamosa ain’t Nepal, but at least there was some imagination working as I viewed the map rather than mindlessly poking a touch screen.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle Earth.

J.R.R. Tolkien knew the allure of maps. His books are famous for their prose, but those maps also sucked you into the story. He carefully drew mountain ranges, forests, swamps and deserts, printing their names with elegant lettering – art in their own right. When you read a passage describing a place Frodo and the gang were going, you’d turn to the beginning of the book to see exactly where it was.

I’ve always been fascinated by maps. I’ll sit down and pore over them, looking at their details – state names, large cities and small towns, rivers, mountains and lakes – my own way of getting to know the land. It’s low-tech, low commitment and engrossing. Someone took the time to plot out a place, and in turn, did their best to write down its details so you can explore it. It’s not a lot different than writing, just fewer words, more visuals to interpret, and so forth. Cartography is a form of storytelling, and storytelling is an art.

And I guess that’s why I opened up my atlas to plot my course instead of looking at my phone. I didn’t head out on a road trip with a goal of merely getting there. I was looking for a story of my own.

I appreciate GPS and the ease of navigation it provides. I love that it’s as close as my pocket. But there’s no romance to it. That’s reserved for my old maps. They illustrate adventure, and that is sexy as hell.

Bob Doucette

Exploring Oklahoma’s Gloss Mountain State Park

An overlook at Gloss Mountain State Park.

I love a good road trip. Pack up the car, drive long miles, see places you’ve never been and make some memories. Heck, I’ve written a book in which most of the settings came by way of road trips out west.

But sometimes you don’t have time for that. And in that case, a day trip will do.

Not quite six years ago I was driving west to go to Black Mesa, home of Oklahoma’s highest point in the far western Panhandle. On the way there, I ran into a surprise bit of scenery. Between the northern Oklahoma towns of Enid and Fairview is a group of mesas that have become known as the Gloss Mountains. They rise suddenly out of the otherwise flat northwestern Oklahoma prairie, and I found them so scenic that I had to pull over, whip out a camera and snap some pics before continuing my drive. I knew one day I’d need to come back for a closer look.

Another outcrop, with a commanding view of the northwestern Oklahoma prairie.Within this range is Gloss Mountain State Park. It’s a small unit of the state’s park system, built for day hikers and casual visitors to check out the unique formations of this area.

Let’s get into a little geological history. How did these things get here? This may surprise you, but the existence of the Gloss Mountains is connected to the Rocky Mountains much farther west.

A look at Lone Peak, as seen from Cathedral Mountain.

At one time, Oklahoma and much of what is now the American West was at the bottom of a prehistoric inland ocean. The continental collision that gave rise to the Rockies also caused the flat seabeds to the east to rise with it, giving birth the the Plains. What was once underwater is now dry land.

In parts of the sea bed, gypsum and selenite deposits settled in with the rest of the sediment. When the sea bed rose, time eroded softer soil and rock away, leaving behind sturdier rock formations that have better resisted the powers of natural erosion. The mesas of the Gloss Mountains are the result.

A better look at the scope of Cathedral Mountain, with Lone Peak in the distance.

The park itself is small, encompassing Lookout Mountain, Cathedral Mountain, the Sphinx and Lone Peak, the highest mesa in the range. There are more formations to the north and west, but those aren’t part of the park.

In the park is a parking area, a couple of shelters where you can grab lunch in some shade, and a small monument bearing the U.S. and Oklahoma flags. It’s easy enough to see where the park is by spotting the flags from the highway.

As seen from Cathedral Mountain, this pointy little spire is called the Sphinx.

A trail leads to the top of Cathedral Mountain. You have to climb about 150 steps to reach the top (it’s fairly steep), and then you have a small network of trails at the top, most with great overlooks of the range and the surrounding prairie. The total trail length, round trip, is about 1.2 miles. If you’re bringing children or dogs with you, mind the parts of the trail near the edges of the mountains; there are some dropoffs where care is needed.

U.S. and Oklahoma flags flying near the trailhead, with Cathedral Mountain in the background.

It’s not a huge hiking day, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. I spotted people hauling camera equipment to the top, looking for just the right place to shoot. Others brought lawn chairs to find a quiet spot near the cliffs’ edges to hang out, enjoy a bite and maybe something cold to drink. Overall, it’s a chill place to hang out and enjoy some time outdoors without the huge commitment of other destinations.

One of the things I enjoy about Oklahoma is that within all that prairie are little surprises like the Gloss Mountains. And I’m fascinated by how this place is linked by a massive mountain range hundreds of miles away.

As a day trip, I dig it. Here’s to finding more fun spots like this in the future.

A thunderstorm blooms in the northwestern Oklahoma sky near Gloss Mountain State Park.

Bob Doucette

A brief exploration of Great Sand Dunes National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park, with the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in the background.

It wasn’t that long ago that a sandy patch of ground in the northern San Luis Valley of Colorado was a national monument. But it’s fitting that the dunes now make up Great Sand Dunes National Park.

It’s likely one of the smaller units in the National Parks System, but at the same time it’s earned its upgrade. If for no other reason, it would have to be its curious nature.

The semi-arid scrub of the San Luis Valley turns into a desert-like landscape where the valley meets the park.

Where else in the country can you slap a scene straight of of the Sahara right in front of the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains? The dunes of the park are the largest in the country, despite there being plenty of deserts throughout the western United States.

And it’s the curiosity of this park that makes it stand out. How did the dunes get here?

Building storms or not, plenty of people were at the park to play. The dunes are so large that the people look like ants.

The answer lies to the west. The San Juan Mountains, which make up some of the most expansive reaches of alpine wilderness in all of Colorado, are in the continual process of erosion, and some of that has pieces of these towering peaks reduced to dust. That dust, or sand, ends up being picked up by strong alpine winds and carried east before running into the wall that is the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. And it’s at the foot of these mountains that those winds dump their sandy cargo. Given enough time and a dusting of sand becomes a wide stretch of dunes, some hundreds of feet high.

People come to see the dunes, but in the summer months, they’re here to play. Boogie boards in hand, park visitors climb the dunes, then ride down as if they were body surfing or snowboarding. Pop in on any given summer afternoon and they’re there by the hundreds.

The meeting of sand and sky is dramatic.

The park has other charms. It’s known as a prime spot to take in the clearest of night skies, and there is plenty of hiking to be had near the park and in the foothills of the Sangres. Other people will explore the dunes just for the views, or possibly be on the lookout for wildlife. Campsites are numerous and many can accommodate pop-up trailers and RVs, but you’ll need to reserve in advance. This is a popular place to camp.

As for me, my visit was brief. I was spending a night in nearby Alamosa, and it seemed to be a wasted opportunity not to go there, check it out, and maybe walk out with some decent photographs.

The scenery didn’t disappoint. It would be worth a return visit to explore more, and I’ve been told that you can get a good deal of solitude in the off-peak seasons. Maybe that’s something I can look forward to in the future.

Bob Doucette